About Us

Name Number Rank Email
Dave Whittle 105 Deputy First Class dwhittle@ windhamsheriff.com
Robert Lakin 109 First Sergeant rlakin@ windhamcountyvt.gov
Dana Shepard 112 Sergeant dshepard@ windhamcountyvt.gov
Joe Borgatti 114 Deputy jborgatt@ windhamsheriff.com
Joseph McNary 119 Deputy jmcnary@ windhamcountyvt.gov
Ian Tuttle 123 Deputy First Class ituttle@ windhamsheriff.com
Paul Samataro 125 Deputy psamatar@ windhamcountvt.gov
William Young 132 Deputy wyoung@ windhamsheriff.com
Josh Parro 134 Deputy jparro@ windhamsheriff.com
Andrew Downs 136 Deputy adowns@ windhamcountvt.gov
Brett Gaylord 137 Deputy First Class bgaylord@ windhamsheriff.com
Tyler Clark 138 Deputy tclark@ windhamsheriff.com
Holly Ellis 141 Administrative Assistant hellis@ windhamsheriff.com
Wendy Wilson 144 Office Manager wwilson@ windhamsheriff.com
Stanley Wasilewski 146 Dispatcher swasilew@ windhamsheriff.com
Lisa Record 147 Dispatcher lrecord@ windhamsheriff.com
Trevor Houle 148 Dispatcher thoule@ windhamcountyvt.gov
Jacquelyn Deedman 149 Dispatcher jdeedman@ windhamcountyvt.gov
Archer Mayor 151 Investigator amayor@ windhamsheriff.com
Christian Ruse 153 Deputy cruse@ windhamcountvt.gov
Casey Bemis 154 Deputy cbemis@ windhamsheriff.com
Mark Gawron 158 Deputy mgawron@ windhamsheriff.com
Ian Gallup 159 Deputy, Dispatch Supervisor igallup@ windhamsheriff.com
John Mariano 162 Deputy jmariano@ windhamsheriff.com
Mark Anderson 165 Captain manderso@ windhamcountyvt.gov
Chris Norton 166 Sergeant cnorton@ windhamcountyvt.gov
Jessica Fellows 167 Lieutenant jfellows@ windhamcountyvt.gov
Michael Roj 175 Deputy First Class mroj@ windhamsheriff.com
Philip Perkins 177 Deputy pperkins@ windhamcountyvt.gov
David Upton 180 Deputy dupton@ windhamsheriff.com
Tyler Cooke 185 Sergeant tcooke@ windhamsheriff.com
Gabriel Cornellier 187 Deputy gcornell@ windhamcountyvt.gov
John Martin 192 Deputy jmartin@ windhamsheriff.com
Randall Johnson 193 Deputy rjohnson@ windhamsheriff.com
Mitch Thomas 197 Maintenence mthomas@ windhamsheriff.com
Sandy Boyd 241 Dispatcher sboyd@ windhamsheriff.com

About

 

Our Organization  

The Windham County Sheriff's Office, located in the county seat of Newfane, Vermont, provides a variety of services and programs to the citizens of Windham County and it's visitors. From policing to service of civil documents, we pride ourselves as being the most versatile agency in Windham County.               

Our Mission

The Windham County Sheriff’s Department’s mission is to provide effective, ethical and affordable policing.

Our Vision

The Windham County Sheriff’s Department will be recognized as the county’s premier law enforcement agency providing innovative programs, cutting edge technologies, and high quality services throughout all of Windham County while retaining the Department’s reputation for being respectful, compassionate, fair and ethical.


Our Memorial

Deputy Mark Dooley

Tour: 01/01/2002 - 09/19/2005

Mark Dooley joined the Windham County Sheriff's Department in 2002, he graduated the Vermont Police Academy and served the citizens of the county as a patrol officer. He left the department to pursue a career in the Military, where he was commissioned a Lieutenant in the Vermont Army National Guard. During this same period he joined the Wilmington VT Police Department as a Police Officer. Mark was activated for duty in Iraq where on September 19, 2005 the vehicle he was riding in was struck by an IED. By whatever title he was known, be it Deputy Sheriff, Police Officer, Lieutenant or just Mark, he will be missed by the family and friends he left behind as well as the people he served, both in Vermont law enforcement and the military.

Mark's Guestbook

See Others

Awards

Medal of Valor

The Medal of Valor may be awarded to a sworn deputy who, in the performance of his/her duty in a situation of extreme danger to the Deputy, and where strong possibility exists that serious injury or death to the Deputy at the time, and the act of valor, bravery or courage is beyond normal expectations.


Sheriff's Cross

The Sheriff’s Cross shall be awarded to a sworn deputy, who in the performance of his/her duty was killed or sustained permanent serious bodily injury.


Distinguished Service Medal

The Distinguished Service Medal may be awarded to a sworn deputy who intelligently performs acts of outstanding personal bravery at imminent personal hazard to life under circumstances demonstrating a disregard of personal consequences.


Deputy Mark H. Dooley Award

The Deputy Mark H. Dooley Award may be awarded to a sworn deputy who demonstrates dedication, compassion, enthusiasm and initiative in policing. This award is limited to one deputy in a calendar year.


Sheriff's Star

The Sheriff’s Star shall be awarded to any employee upon honorable separation, including death, which has accumulated 20 or more years of service with the Windham County Sheriff’s Office. The Sheriff’s Star may be awarded posthumously to a deputy who dies while employed by the Office, regardless of years of service.


Life Saving Award

The Life Saving Award shall be awarded to any employee who provides, or is directly responsible for, life saving actions for a condition of which a high probability exists that a person will suffer serious bodily injury or death without the employee’s intervention.


Deputy of the Year

The Deputy of the Year shall be selected based on excellent, unusual or continued dedication to the Office and to Windham County, as recognized by superiors, peers and the public as measured across the calendar year.


Dispatcher of the Year

The Dispatcher of the Year shall be selected based on excellent, unusual or continued dedication to the Department and to Windham County, as recognized by superiors, peers and the public as measured across the calendar year.


Sheriff's Merit Award

The Sheriff's Merit Award shall be awarded to a sworn deputy that has demonstrated unusual devotion to duty or valor, over a continual and recognized period of time.


Volunteer Service Award

The Volunteer Service Award shall be awarded to the top 10% of employees who volunteers their time in the performance of a coordinated Office event.


Distinguished Accomplishment

The Distinguished Accomplishment award shall be awarded to any employee, who provides an outstanding or meritorious service, product or program that reflects positively on the Office that demonstrates unusual thoroughness, conscientiousness, determination and initiative. It may be awarded to an employee who has performed an efficient and valuable service to the Office, either in carrying out a specific task or in the performance of general duties over an extended period of time, that wouldn’t be eligible for a higher award.


Exemplary Service Award

The Exemplary Service Award shall be awarded to any employee, who demonstrates exemplary service in job performance, citizen contacts, and overall attitude and has three occurrences or less of lost time in a year (excluding injured or maternity time) and no sustained disciplinary action for a period of two years.


Night Owl

Worked more than 2,000 hours between 22:00 & 06:00


Traffic Cop

Issued more than 1,000 tickets in a calendar year.


Distinguished Employee Award

The Distinguished Employee Award is given to an employee who demonstrates unusual flexibility, positive attitude, commitment and professionalism to the Windham County Sheriff's Office over a continued period of time.


Five Year Service Award

Awarded to employees who have worked for the Windham County Sheriff's Office for five continuous years.


Ten Year Service Award

Awarded to employees who have worked for the Windham County Sheriff's Office for ten continuous years.


Fifteen Year Service Award

Awarded to employees who have worked for the Windham County Sheriff's Office for fifteen continuous years.


History of the Office of the Sheriff

The first of two important characteristics that distinguish the Office of Sheriff from other law enforcement units is its historical roots. In England, the sheriff came into existence around the 9th century. This makes the sheriff the oldest continuing, non-military, law enforcement entity in history. In early England the land was divided into geographic areas between a few individual kings – these geographic areas were called shires. Within each shire there was an individual called a reeve, which meant guardian. This individual was originally selected by the serfs to be their informal social and governmental leader. The kings observed how influential this individual was within the serf community and soon incorporated that position into the governmental structure. The reeve soon became the Kings appointed representative to protect the King’s interest and act as mediator with people of his particular shire. Through time and usage the words shire and reeve came together to be shire-reeve, guardian of the shire and eventually the word sheriff, as we know it today. The Office of Sheriff grew in importance with increasing responsibilities up to and through the Norman invasion of England in 1066.  The duties of the sheriff included keeping the peace, collecting taxes, maintaining jails, arresting fugitives, maintaining a list of wanted criminals, and serving orders and writs for the Kings Court. Most of those duties are still the foundation of the sheriff’s responsibilities in the United States. The responsibilities of the Office of Sheriff in England ebbed and flowed, depending on the mood and needs of kings and government. In 1215 the great document of freedom, the Magna Carta, was reluctantly signed by King John. This document had 63 clauses, 27 of which are related to the restrictions upon, as well as, the responsibilities of the sheriff. Through the passage of time, the English sheriff began to lose responsibility and power, and by the early 1800’s it became largely ceremonial, as it remains today.

The concept of sheriff, because of the vast British Empire, was exported to places such as Canada, Australia, India, and, of course, the American Colonies. In America, the office was modified over a period of time to fit democratic ideals. The Dutch settled the area called New Amsterdam (what is now New York City) in 1626. The Dutch version of the sheriff was called a “schout.” When the English claimed the land, the schout became the sheriff. In the other American colonies, following the pattern of English government, sheriffs were appointed. The first sheriff in America is believed to be Captain William Stone, appointed in 1634 for the Shire of Northampton in the colony of Virginia. The first elected sheriff was William Waters in 1652 in the same shire (shire was used in many of the colonies, before the word county replaced it.)

The sheriff’s office in America was much less social, had less judicial influence, and was much more responsive to individuals than the English Sheriff. The duties of the early American Sheriff were similar in many ways to its English forerunner, centering on court related duties such as security and warrants, protection of citizens, maintaining the jail, and collecting taxes. As the nation expanded westward, the Office of Sheriff continued to be a significant part of law enforcement. The elected sheriff is part of America’s democratic fabric. In 1776 Pennsylvania and New Jersey adopted the Office of Sheriff in their Constitution. The Ohio Constitution called for the election of the county sheriff in 1802, and then state-by-state, the democratic election of sheriff became not only a tradition, but in most states a constitutional requirement. In the United States today, of the 3083 sheriffs, approximately 98 percent are elected by the citizens of their counties or parishes. - National Sheriff's Association